Newsroom
  • July 28 , 2020

    Higher BPA levels linked to more asthma symptoms in children

    Children in low-income neighborhoods in Baltimore tended to have more asthma symptoms when levels of the synthetic chemical BPA (Bisphenol A) in their urine were elevated, according to a study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and School of Medicine.
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  • July 27 , 2020

    Study shows three medications currently on the market may have unexpected effects

    A new study of 1,443 medications found that three prescription drugs currently on the market caused unexpected changes in worms that could point to potential, unrecognized effects in humans. The study shows that a microscopic nematode worm called C. elegans, which is commonly used in biology experiments, can serve as a quick, inexpensive tool to identify ta
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  • July 27 , 2020

    Artificial intelligence identifies prostate cancer with near-perfect accuracy

    A study published today in The Lancet Digital Health by UPMC and University of Pittsburgh researchers demonstrates the highest accuracy to date in recognizing and characterizing prostate cancer using an artificial intelligence (AI) program. "Humans are good at recognizing anomalies, but they have their own biases or past experience," said senior author Raji
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  • July 26 , 2020

    Novel drug delivery particles use neurotransmitters as a 'passport' into the brain

    ​Biomedical engineers at the Tufts University School of Engineering have developed tiny lipid-based nanoparticles that incorporate neurotranmitters to help carry drugs, large molecules, and even gene editing proteins across the blood-brain barrier and into the brain in mice. The innovation, published today in Science Advances, could overcome many of the curr
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  • July 26 , 2020

    Antibiotics alone successfully treat uncomplicated appendicitis in children

    Appendicitis is the most common cause for emergency abdominal surgery in childhood, affecting 80,000 children in the United States each year, but nonoperative treatment options are viable. A study performed by the Midwest Pediatric Surgery Consortium, led by Peter Minneci, MD, and Katherine Deans, MD, co-founders and directors of the Center for Surgical Outc
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  • July 25 , 2020

    Rapid COVID-19 test detects neutralising antibodies with high specificity and sensitivity

    As the current COVID-19 pandemic continues to adversely impact communities and economies across the world, efficiency in testing for the infection and antibodies is vital. A unique and rapid SARS-CoV-2 surrogate virus neutralization test (sVNT), developed in Singapore, may be the much-needed boost to current COVID-19 investigations to determine infection rat
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  • July 24 , 2020

    Google AI outperforms general pathologists at validating Gleason grading of prostate cancer biopsies

    A team of researchers from Google Health, working with others from institutions across the U.S. and Canada has found that a Google AI system was able to outperform general pathologists when validating Gleason grading of prostate cancer biopsies. In their paper published in JAMA Oncology, the group describes two major experiments they conducted that compared
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  • July 24 , 2020

    New study explains how the Warsaw Ghetto beat typhus

    New modeling of typhus infections in the Warsaw Ghetto during WWII reveals how public health interventions eradicated the disease.
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  • July 23 , 2020

    Battle royale: How bacteria fight antibiotics and up the ante in chemical warfare

    Inadequate development of new antibiotics and rising rates of resistance by bacteria to existing antimicrobials are dual forces pushing the world ever closer to a post-antibiotic era.
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  • July 23 , 2020

    Lung ultrasound shows duration, severity of coronavirus disease

    According to an open-access article published in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), lung ultrasound (US) was highly sensitive for detecting abnormalities in patients with coronavirus disease (COVID-19), with B-lines, a thickened pleural line, and pulmonary consolidation the most commonly observed features.
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  • July 22 , 2020

    Malaria breakthrough set to change vaccine design

    Researchers from the Australian National University (ANU) have discovered a vital clue as to why malaria vaccines keep failing, which could potentially change how vaccines for the deadly disease and others are made.
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  • July 22 , 2020

    Researchers track down metabolic enzyme that protects against inflammation

    Scrape your knee, and you'll see some red puffiness appear around the injury. This is inflammation, and it is driven by the immune system.
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