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  • June 16 , 2021

    P-glycoprotein removes Alzheimer's-associated toxin from the brain

    A team of SMU biological scientists has confirmed that P-glycoprotein (P-gp) has the ability to remove from the brain a toxin that is associated with Alzheimer's disease.
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  • June 16 , 2021

    Scientists are deciphering the details of immune cell activation

    Chemokine receptors, located at the surface of many immune cells, play an important role in cell function. Chemokines are small proteins that bind to these receptors and control the movement and behavior of white blood cells.
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  • June 15 , 2021

    Researchers discover that a protein that facilitates DNA repair may enhance chemotherapy

    CNIO researchers have found out how the cell does that and plan to use this knowledge to enhance cancer treatments.
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  • June 15 , 2021

    Novel radiopharmaceutical tracks 'master switch' protein responsible for cancer growth

    A protein that is critical in cancer cell metabolism has been imaged for the first time with a newly developed radiopharmaceutical, 18F-DASA-23. Imaging with this novel agent has the potential to improve the assessment of treatment response for patients, specifically those with brain tumors. This study was presented at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Mol
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  • June 15 , 2021

    Study reveals new pathway for brain tumor therapy

    In a new study led by Yale Cancer Center, researchers show the nucleoside transporter ENT2 may offer an unexpected path to circumventing the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and enabling targeted treatment of brain tumors with a cell-penetrating anti-DNA autoantibody. The study was published today online in the Journal of Clinical Investigation Insight.
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  • June 14 , 2021

    Study finds dosing strategy may affect immunotherapy outcomes

    Overweight cancer patients receiving immunotherapy treatments live more than twice as long as lighter patients, but only when dosing is weight-based, according to a study by cancer researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center.
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  • June 14 , 2021

    An omega-3 that's poison for tumors

    ​So-called "good fatty acids" are essential for human health. Among the Omega-3 fatty acids, DHA, or docosahexaenoic acid, is crucial to brain function, vision and the regulation of inflammatory phenomena.
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  • June 14 , 2021

    New gene therapy uses Tylenol to combat genetic diseases

    Researchers have developed a new approach to gene therapy that leans on the common pain reliever acetaminophen to force a variety of genetic diseases into remission.
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  • June 14 , 2021

    A new model of Alzheimer's progression

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia and is characterized by neurodegeneration in regions of the brain involved in memory and learning. Amyloid beta and tau are two toxic proteins that build up in disease and cause eventual neuronal death, but little is known about how other cells in the brain react during disease progression.
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  • June 14 , 2021

    Toward the first drug to treat a rare, lethal liver cancer

    Sanford M. Simon and his group understood that patients dying of fibrolamellar could not afford to wait.The team ultimately discovered a few classes of therapeutics that destroy fibrolamellar tumor cells growing in mice. Their findings are published in Cancer Discovery.
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  • June 10 , 2021

    A new technique for correcting disease-causing mutations

    Gene editing, or purposefully changing a gene's DNA sequence, is a powerful tool for studying how mutations cause disease, and for making changes in an individual's DNA for therapeutic purposes. A novel method of gene editing that can be used for both purposes has now been developed by a team led by Guoping Feng, the James W. (1963) and Patricia T. Poitras P
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  • June 10 , 2021

    Study shows how certain macrophages dampen anti-tumor immunity

    A Ludwig Cancer Research study adds to growing evidence that immune cells known as macrophages inhabiting the body cavities that house our vital organs can aid tumor growth by distracting the immune system's cancer-killing CD8+ T cells.
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